Blue planet project book pdf

 

    the Project Blue Book Office at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. conditions, the planets, including Venus, Jupiter, and Mars have been reported as. % Satisfaction is Guaranteed! There are no problems in page content and in the paper. You will be the first to open the book cover. For Used condition books . experience gained from investigating. UFO reports since. , the conclusions of Project. Blue Book are: l! no UFO reported, investigated, and evaluated by.

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    Blue Planet Project Book Pdf

    Project Blue Book was one of a series of systematic studies of unidentified flying objects (UFOs) .. These stars and planets are on the opposite side of the earth from Oklahoma City at this time of year. .. original; ^ billpercompzulbe.ga billpercompzulbe.ga Archived at the Wayback Machine | Quintanilla, H. ( ). Blue Planet Project - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. BLUE PLANET PROJECT Alien Technical Research - 25 Westchester Camp Office of Central Research #3 billpercompzulbe.ga billpercompzulbe.ga reported UFO objects and sightings under Project Blue Book. .. astronomical objects (such as stars, planets, the sun and the moon), weather.

    Air Force Regulation , Unidentified Flying Objects Reporting In his book see external links Ruppelt described the demoralization of the Blue Book staff and the stripping of their investigative duties following the Robertson Panel jurisdiction. As an immediate consequence of the Robertson Panel recommendations, in February , the Air Force issued Regulation , ordering air base officers to publicly discuss UFO incidents only if they were judged to have been solved, and to classify all the unsolved cases to keep them out of the public eye. The nd AISS was assigned the task of investigating only the most important UFO cases with intelligence or national security implications. These cases were deliberately siphoned away from Blue Book, leaving Blue Book to deal with the more trivial reports. In addition, UFOs called "UFOBs" were defined as "any airborne object which by performance, aerodynamic characteristics, or unusual features, does not conform to any presently known aircraft or missile type, or which cannot be positively identified as a familiar object. If they were unidentified, the media was to be told only that the situation was being analyzed. Blue Book was also ordered to reduce the number of unidentified to a minimum. All this work was done secretly. The public face of Blue Book continued to be the official Air Force investigation of UFOs, but the reality was it had essentially been reduced to doing very little serious investigation, and had become almost solely a public relations outfit with a debunking mandate. To cite one example, by the end of , the number of cases listed as unsolved had dipped to barely 0.

    Jump to Page. Search inside document. The following document is believed to be the personal notes and scientific dairy of a scientist who was contracted by the government over several years to visit all crash sites, interrogate captured Alien Life Forms and analyze all data gathered from that endeavor. He also wrote notes on or about any documents which he came in contact with, which in any way related directly or indirectly to the organization, structure or operation for the collection of such data.

    This individual was discovered to have kept and maintained such personal notes and therefore was scheduled for termination. He narrowly escaped termination by the government and is currently in hiding out of this country. We believe his involvement in these investigations span over a thirty-three 33 year period. He was soon discovered and immediately went into hiding in We modified his personal notes only so slightly, and only when necessary to make them flow together and read correctly.

    When you read this document, it may disturb you. The real facts have a tendency to do exactly that, but this information needs to get to the general public. At this time, to the best of the data we have available, there are at least one hundred and sixty species or races of Aliens from different galaxies, stars and planets we have encountered.

    You will find as much data as we have available thru on each race in the following pages, as each race is discussed. There are still more Aliens we haven't encountered yet, but we feel it won't be long before we do There will be more to come later. Each U. This unprecedented authority underlined the seriousness of Blue Book's investigation. Astronomer Dr. Allen Hynek was the scientific consultant of the project, as he had been with Projects Sign and Grudge.

    Blue Planet Project

    He worked for the project up to its termination and initially created the categorization which has been extended and is known today as Close encounters. He was a pronounced skeptic when he started, but said that his feelings changed to a more wavering skepticism during the research, after encountering a minority of UFO reports he thought were unexplainable.

    Ruppelt left Blue Book in February for a temporary reassignment. He returned a few months later to find his staff reduced from more than ten, to two subordinates. In July , after a build-up of hundreds of sightings over the previous few months, a series of radar detections coincident with visual sightings were observed near the National Airport in Washington, D. UFO incident. Future Arizona Senator and presidential nominee, the late, John McCain is alleged to be one of these witnesses [ citation needed ].

    After much publicity, these sightings led the Central Intelligence Agency to establish a panel of scientists headed by Dr. Robertson, a physicist of the California Institute of Technology, which included various physicists, meteorologists, and engineers, and one astronomer Hynek. The Robertson Panel first met on January 14, in order to formulate a response to the overwhelming public interest in UFOs. Ruppelt, Hynek, and others presented the best evidence, including movie footage, that had been collected by Blue Book.

    After spending 12 hours reviewing 6 years of data, the Robertson Panel concluded that most UFO reports had prosaic explanations, and that all could be explained with further investigation, which they deemed not worth the effort.

    In their final report, they stressed that low-grade, unverifiable UFO reports were overloading intelligence channels, with the risk of missing a genuine conventional threat to the U. Therefore, they recommended the Air Force de-emphasize the subject of UFOs and embark on a debunking campaign to lessen public interest.

    They suggested debunkery through the mass media, including Walt Disney Productions , and using psychologists, astronomers, and celebrities to ridicule the phenomenon and put forward prosaic explanations. The apparent irresponsibility and the possible use of such groups for subversive purposes should be kept in mind. It is the conclusion of many researchers [7] [9] that the Robertson Panel was recommending controlling public opinion through a program of official propaganda and spying.

    They also believe these recommendations helped shape Air Force policy regarding UFO study not only immediately afterward, but also into the present day.

    There is evidence that the Panel's recommendations were being carried out at least two decades after its conclusions were issued see the main article for details and citations.

    In his book see external links Ruppelt described the demoralization of the Blue Book staff and the stripping of their investigative duties following the Robertson Panel jurisdiction. As an immediate consequence of the Robertson Panel recommendations, in February , the Air Force issued Regulation , ordering air base officers to publicly discuss UFO incidents only if they were judged to have been solved, and to classify all the unsolved cases to keep them out of the public eye.

    The nd AISS was assigned the task of investigating only the most important UFO cases with intelligence or national security implications. These cases were deliberately siphoned away from Blue Book, leaving Blue Book to deal with the more trivial reports. In addition, UFOs called "UFOBs" were defined as "any airborne object which by performance, aerodynamic characteristics, or unusual features, does not conform to any presently known aircraft or missile type, or which cannot be positively identified as a familiar object.

    If they were unidentified, the media was to be told only that the situation was being analyzed. Blue Book was also ordered to reduce the number of unidentified to a minimum. All this work was done secretly. The public face of Blue Book continued to be the official Air Force investigation of UFOs, but the reality was it had essentially been reduced to doing very little serious investigation, and had become almost solely a public relations outfit with a debunking mandate.

    To cite one example, by the end of , the number of cases listed as unsolved had dipped to barely 0. Eventually, Ruppelt requested reassignment; at his departure in August , his staff had been reduced from more than ten precise numbers of personnel varied to just two subordinates and himself. His temporary replacement was a noncommissioned officer.

    Most who succeeded him as Blue Book director exhibited either apathy or outright hostility to the subject of UFOs, or were hampered by a lack of funding and official support. Ruppelt wrote that Hardin "thinks that anyone who is even interested [in UFOs] is crazy. They bore him. Captain George T. Gregory took over as Blue Book's director in In fact, there was actually little or no investigation of UFO reports; a revised AFR issued during Gregory's tenure emphasized that unexplained UFO reports must be reduced to a minimum.

    One way that Gregory reduced the number of unexplained UFOs was by simple reclassification. By this logic, a possible comet became a probable comet, while a probable comet was flatly declared to have been a misidentified comet.

    Similarly, if a witness reported an observation of an unusual balloon- like object, Blue Book usually classified it as a balloon, with no research and qualification. These procedures became standard for most of Blue Book's later investigations; see Hynek's comments below. Major Robert J. Friend was appointed the head of Blue Book in Friend made some attempts to reverse the direction Blue Book had taken since Clark writes that "Friend's efforts to upgrade the files and catalog sightings according to various observed statistics were frustrated by a lack of funding and assistance.

    Hynek suggested that some older UFO reports should be reevaluated, with the ostensible aim of moving them from the "unknown" to the "identified" category. Hynek's plans came to naught. In , there were U. Congressional hearings regarding UFOs.

    In response, ATIC added personnel increasing the total personnel to three military personnel, plus civilian secretaries and increased Blue Book's budget. This seemed to mollify some of Blue Book's critics, [9] but it was only temporary. A few years later see below , the criticism would be even louder.

    By the time he was transferred from Blue Book in , Friend thought that Blue Book was effectively useless and ought to be dissolved, even if it caused an outcry amongst the public. He largely continued the debunking efforts, and it was under his direction that Blue Book received some of its sharpest criticism. Physicist and UFO researcher Dr. James E. McDonald once flatly declared that Quintanilla was "not competent" from either a scientific or an investigative perspective, [12] although he also stressed that Quintanilla "shouldn't be held accountable for it," as he was chosen for his position by a superior officer, and was following orders in directing Blue Book.

    Blue Book's explanations of UFO reports were not universally accepted, however, and critics — including some scientists — suggested that Project Blue Book performed questionable research or, worse, was perpetrating cover up. Take, for example, the many mostly nighttime UFO reports from the midwestern and southeastern United States in the summer of Witnesses in Texas reported "multicolored lights" and large aerial objects shaped like eggs or diamonds.

    John Shockley, a meteorologist from Wichita, Kansas , reported that, using the state Weather Bureau radar , he tracked a number of odd aerial objects flying at altitudes between about and feet. Project Blue Book officially determined [9] the witnesses had mistaken Jupiter or bright stars such as Rigel or Betelgeuse for something else. Blue Book's explanation was widely criticized as inaccurate. These stars and planets are on the opposite side of the earth from Oklahoma City at this time of year.

    The Air Force must have had its star finder upside-down during August. A newspaper editorial from the Richmond News Leader opined that "Attempts to dismiss the reported sightings under the rationale as exhibited by Project Bluebook [ sic ] won't solve the mystery Police officers Dale Spaur and Wilbur Neff spotted what they described as a disc-shaped, silvery object with a bright light emanating from its underside, at about feet in altitude.

    The chase ended about 30 minutes later near Freedom, Pennsylvania , some 85 miles away. Five days later, following brief interviews with only one of the police officers but none of the other ground witnesses , Blue Book's director, Major Hector Quintanilla , announced their conclusions: The police one of them an Air Force gunner during the Korean War had first chased a communications satellite , then the planet Venus. This conclusion was widely derided, [9] and police officers strenuously rejected it.

    In his dissenting conclusion, Hynek described Blue Book's conclusions as absurd: Once people entrusted with the public welfare no longer think the people can handle the truth, then the people, in return, will no longer trust the government. Sleeper noted that Hynek had publicly accused Blue Book of shoddy science, and further asked Hynek to offer advice on how Blue Book could improve its scientific methods.

    Hynek was to later declare that Sleeper's letter was "the first time in my 20 year association with the air force as scientific consultant that I had been officially asked for criticism and advice [regarding] Hynek wrote a detailed response, dated October 7, , suggesting several areas where Blue Book could improve.

    In part, he wrote:. Despite Sleeper's request for criticism, none of Hynek's commentary resulted in any substantial changes in Blue Book. Col Quintanilla wrote the manuscript in , but it was not published until after his death in Quintanilla states in the text that he personally believed it arrogant to think human beings were the only intelligent life in the universe.

    Yet, while he found it highly likely that intelligent life existed beyond earth, he had no hard evidence of any extra terrestrial visitation. None of these were extraterrestrial or a threat to national security. Allen Hynek, a science consultant to Blue Book, suggested in an unedited statement that a "civilian panel of physical and social scientists" be formed "for the express purpose of determining whether a major problem really exist" in regards to UFOs.

    Criticism of Blue Book continued to grow through the mids. Government with a cover-up of UFO evidence. Following U.

    Congressional hearings, the Condon Committee was established in , ostensibly as a neutral scientific research body. However, the Committee became mired in controversy, with some members charging director Edward U.

    Condon with bias, and critics would question the validity and the scientific rigor of the Condon Report. In the end, the Condon Committee suggested that there was nothing extraordinary about UFOs, and while it left a minority of cases unexplained, the report also argued that further research would not be likely to yield significant results. Seamans, Jr. According to Sparks, Air Force officials wanted to keep the Air Force's reaction to the UFO problem from overlapping into a fourth decade, and thus altered the date of Blue Book's closure in official files.

    Major David Shea was to later claim that Maxwell was chosen because it was "accessible yet not too inviting. Of a total of 12, sightings reported to Project Blue Book, remained "unidentified.

    As a result of these investigations, studies and experience gained from investigating UFO reports since , the conclusions of Project Blue Book were:.

    Blue Planet Project

    With the termination of Project Blue Book, the Air Force regulation establishing and controlling the program for investigating and analyzing UFOs was rescinded. Documentation regarding the former Blue Book investigation was permanently transferred to the Modern Military Branch, National Archives and Records Service, and is available for public review and analysis.

    There are a number of universities and professional scientific organizations that have considered UFO phenomena during periodic meetings and seminars. A list of private organizations interested in aerial phenomena may be found in "Encyclopaedia of Associations", published by Gale Research.

    Interest in and timely review of UFO reports by private groups ensures that sound evidence is not overlooked by the scientific community. Persons wishing to report UFO sightings should be advised to contact local law enforcement agencies. Bolander states that even after Blue Book was dissolved, that "reports of UFOs" would still "continue to be handled through the standard Air Force procedure designed for this purpose.

    Air Force has continued to catalog and track UFO sightings, particularly a series of dozens of UFO encounters from the late s to the mids that occurred at U.

    Project Blue Book

    Blum writes that some of these official documents depart drastically from the normally dry and bureaucratic wording of government paperwork, making obvious the sense of "terror" that these UFO incidents inspired in many U. It was the Battelle Institute that devised the standardized reporting form.

    Starting in late March , the Institute started analyzing existing sighting reports and encoding about 30 report characteristics onto IBM punched cards for computer analysis. Even today, it represents the largest such study ever undertaken.